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Chicago Notes & Bibliography

Overview

This page provides examples for sources that don't fit into standard categories; often called grey literature. Some specialist material is also included. Have we missed anything? Let us know and we will add an example.

The relevant Chicago Manual of Style chapters are linked across many of the examples and notes below so that more information can be located easily in the online manual.

Grey literature

Pamphlets and reports: [14.220] Pamphlets, corporate reports, brochures, and other freestanding publications are treated essentially as books. Data on author and publisher may not fit the normal pattern, but sufficient information should be given to identify the document.

See also Webpages and online documents - Government document.

Theses & dissertations - online [14.215]

First footnote
3. Alistair Thomson, "The Great War and Australian Memory: A Study of Myth, Remembering and Oral History" (PhD thesis, University of Sussex, 1990), 169, http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.292571.

Subsequent footnotes
5. Thomson, "Great War," 171.

Bibliography

Thomson, Alistair. "The Great War and Australian Memory: A Study of Myth, Remembering and Oral History." PhD thesis, University of Sussex, 1990. http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.292571.

 

Theses & dissertations - print [14.215]

First footnote
9. M. Pina Ford, “The Natural Law Context of Thomas More’s Utopia” (PhD thesis, University of Western Australia, 2000), 59.

Subsequent footnotes
12. Ford, “Thomas More’s Utopia,” 59.

Bibliography

Ford, M. Pina. “The Natural Law Context of Thomas More’s Utopia.” PhD thesis, University of Western Australia, 2000.

Working papers, discussion papers and similar documents, sometimes produced in advance of publication on a particular topic, can be treated in much the same way as a dissertation or thesis [14.215] or lecture, paper or other presentation [14.217]


Working paper - part of a formal series title [14.218]

First footnote
1. Brendan Coates et al., "Shutdown: Estimating the COVID-19 Employment Shock," (Grattan Institute Working Paper No. 2020-03, Grattan Institute, Melbourne, VIC, April 2020), 15, https://grattan.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Shutdown-estimating-the-COVID-19-employment-shock-Grattan-Institute.pdf.

Subsequent footnotes
7. Coates et al., "Shutdown," 23.

Bibliography

Coates, Brendan, Matt Cowgill, Tony Chen, and Will Mackey. "Shutdown: Estimating the COVID-19 Employment Shock." Grattan Institute Working Paper No. 2020-03, Grattan Institute, Melbourne, VIC, April 2020. https://grattan.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Shutdown-estimating-the-COVID-19-employment-shock-Grattan-Institute.pdf.


Working paper - no formal series title [14.218]

First footnote
1. Victor Gekara et al., "Developing Appropriate Workforce Skills for Australia’s Emerging Digital Economy," (working paper, National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Adelaide, SA, 2017), 18, https://www.ncver.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0035/968813/Developing-appropriate-workforce-skills.pdf.

Subsequent footnotes
7. Gekara et al., "Developing Appropriate Workforce Skills," 45.

Bibliography

Gekara, Victor, Alemayehu Molla, Darryn Snell, Stan Karanasios, and Amanda Thomas. "Developing Appropriate Workforce Skills for Australia’s Emerging Digital Economy." Working paper, National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Adelaide, SA, 2017. https://www.ncver.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0035/968813/Developing-appropriate-workforce-skills.pdf.

Conference papers - online [14.217]

First footnote
6. Veronica Meredith, Penelope Rush, and Elly Robinson, "Fly-In Fly-Out Workforce Practices in Australia: The Effects on Children and Family Relationships" (conference paper, 13th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne, February 2014), https://www3.aifs.gov.au/cfca/publications/fly-fly-out-workforce-practices-australia.

Subsequent footnotes
8. Meredith, Rush, and Robinson, "Fly-In Fly-Out."

Bibliography

Meredith, Veronica, Penelope Rush, and Elly Robinson. "Fly-In Fly-Out Workforce Practices in Australia: The Effects on Children and Family Relationships." Paper presented at the13th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne, February 2014. https://www3.aifs.gov.au/cfca/publications/fly-fly-out-workforce-practices-australia.

 

Conference papers - print [14.217]

First footnote
7. Mark Zwolinski, "Effects of Study Habits on Scholastic Achievement" (conference paper, Third Semi-annual Meeting of the Anderson Society for Educational Measurement, San Diego, CA, September 2009).

Subsequent footnotes
9. Zwolinski, "Effects of Study Habits."

Bibliography

Zwolinski, Mark. "Effects of Study Habits on Scholastic Achievement". Paper presented at the Third Semi-annual Meeting of the Anderson Society for Educational Measurement, San Diego, CA, September 2009.

Powerpoint slides - online [14.217]

First footnote
6. Ashley Casey, "Developing a Pedagogy of Technology in Physical Education" (PowerPoint slides, Slideshare, February 16, 2014), http://www.slideshare.net/DrAshCasey/developing-a-pedagogy-of-technology-in-physical-education.

Subsequent footnotes
8. Casey, "Developing a Pedagogy."

Bibliography

Casey, Ashley. "Developing a Pedagogy of Technology in Physical Education." PowerPoint slides, Slideshare, February 16, 2014. http://www.slideshare.net/DrAshCasey/developing-a-pedagogy-of-technology-in-physical-education.

Specialist subject material

Well-known dictionaries & encyclopaedias: [14.232] Well-known reference works, such as major dictionaries and encyclopedias, are normally cited in footnotes and omitted from the bibliography. The facts of publication are omitted, but the edition (if not the first) must be specified, as well as the date the volume was issued.

Most other reference works are listed in footnotes and bibliography, with full publication details.

For references to an alphabetically arranged work (e.g. dictionary) cite the item (not the page number) preceded by s.v. e.g. Encyclopaedia Britannica, 15th ed. (1980), s.v. “salvation.”

Dictionaries & encyclopaedias consulted online: [14.233] Major/well-known online dictionaries and encyclopedias are also normally cited in footnotes and omitted from the bibliography.

For continually updated resources, include a posted or revised date instead of an edition number. If none is available, supply an access date. Include time stamps for frequently updated resources e.g. Wikipedia.

Include a URL or name of the library database as the last element of the citation.

Authors: [14.234] For dictionaries and encyclopedias with authored entries, it may be appropriate to cite such entries by author.

 

Dictionary - online

First footnote
2. Macquarie Dictionary, 6th ed. (2013), s.v. "liturgy," Credo.

Subsequent footnotes
Dictionary definitions are not usually repeated.

Bibliography
Not applicable for well-known works.

 

Encyclopaedia - online

First footnote
3. Catalin Partenie, "Plato's Myths," in Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Stanford University, Summer 2014), https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2014/entries/plato-myths/.

Subsequent footnotes
6. Partenie, "Plato's Myths."

Bibliography

Partenie, Catalin. "Plato's Myths." In Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford University, Summer 2014. Article published July 23, 2009; last modified June 19, 2014. https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/sum2014/entries/plato-myths/.

Cases, Legislation, and Hansard: [14.269, see also subsequent sections] Chicago Manual of Style directs users to follow guidelines in The Bluebook for citing legal works.  AGLC is based on The Bluebook and should be followed, in Australia, as the guide for citing legal materials.

AGLC - Cases
AGLC - Legislation
AGLC - Extrinsic Materials (incl. Hansard)

Secondary reference (source within a source)

Secondary references: [14.260] To cite a source from a secondary source you have not read is discouraged in scholarly writingStudents should find the original source and interrogate its meaning directly. When an author’s work is presented through someone else’s eyes, it can impose an interpretation and understanding that is held by the second author rather than the meaning intended by the original author. In some cases, the second author may even be debunking the original or looking at it from a completely different perspective, and the variation in context may be missed by you, leading to a serious distortion in meaning.

If you wish to use secondary referencing, contact your lecturer or tutor: if they allow it, then follow the instructions below; if they do not allow it, find a different source for your discussion.

You must make it clear that you are citing a work that has been cited by another. The reference list entry should show the source you have actually read so, like the example below, you would provide the details for Costello in the bibliography, not Zukofsky.

 

First footnote
9. Louis Zukofsky, “Sincerity and Objectification,” Poetry 37 (February 1931): 269, quoted in Bonnie Costello, Marianne Moore: Imaginary Possessions (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1981), 78.

Subsequent footnotes
21. Zukofsky, "Sincerity and Objectification," 78, quoted in Costello, Marianne Moore, 78.

Bibliography

Costello, Bonnie, Marianne Moore: Imaginary Possessions. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1981.