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Notre Dame 5 Star University
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Copyright and legal re-use

Contains information on using (and re-using) material that isn't your own, and the limits that apply to this use.

Using radio and television broadcasts

TYPES OF WORK HOW TO USE FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES
  For Students For Teaching Staff For Publishing

Radio and Television
Includes: Australian Pay-TV Services, and some Podcasts.

Can be copied in entirety.
Attribution required.

Can be copied in entirety.
Attribution required.
Must apply appropriate
copyright notice.

Permission required from both Copyright Owner and Moral Rights Holder.
Usage fees may apply.
Attribution required.

Specific information for students on how to (re)use this type of work for educational purposes (assignments, projects, etc.):
 
  • From physical sources (CDs, DVDs, tapes, etc)
    You may copy the whole radio or television broadcast under the licence parameters listed above, but don't forget to reference/attribute it.
     
  • From online/radio/television sources
    You may copy the whole radio or television broadcast under the licence parameters listed above, as long as the terms of use of the website (or licence/contract) do not state otherwise.
Specific information for teaching staff on how to (re)use this type of work for educational purposes (PowerPoint presentations, handouts, etc.):
 
  • From physical sources (CDs, DVDs, tapes, etc)
    You may copy the whole radio or television broadcast (according to the terms of the Statutory Licence), but don't forget to reference/attribute it. You must apply the appropriate copyright notice to all copies made.
     
  • From online/radio/television sources
    You may copy the whole radio or television broadcast (according to the terms of the Statutory Licence), as long as the terms of use of the website (or licence/contract) do not state otherwise. You must apply the appropriate copyright notice to all copies made.


All material copied under the Statutory Licence and communicated to students (LMS upload, email, etc) must have a warning notice attached near the front of the material (for example, as the second slide of a PowerPoint presentation after the title page). If the New Statutory Licence - Reproduction Notice PDF (see link below) is not used, then the following notice text must be included in entirety:

WARNING 
This material has been reproduced and communicated to you by or on behalf of The University of Notre Dame Australia in accordance with section 113P of the Copyright Act 1968 (Act).
The material in this communication may be subject to copyright under the Act. Any further reproduction or communication of this material by you may be the subject of copyright protection under the Act.
Do not remove this notice.


IMPORTANT: You must ensure that the radio or television broadcast you want to use falls within the scope of the Statutory Licence, or is marked with an appropriate Creative Commons licence, or is part of the Public Domain.

Specific information for researchers on how to (re)use this type of work for publishing purposes (thesis, journal article, book chapter, etc.):
 
  • From physical sources (CDs, DVDs, tapes, etc)
    Permission is required from the copyright owner to use the appropriately referenced material in a publication. If you are not able to find or contact the copyright owner, please contact the Copyright Officer for assistance. For where to store this data in the research repository, please contact the Manager, Research Services.
     
  • From online sources
    Permission is required from the copyright and moral rights owner(s) to use the appropriately referenced material in a publication. If you are not able to find or contact the copyright owner, please contact the Copyright Officer for assistance. Usage fees may apply.
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Finding copyright-friendly material

The following lists of sites contain sources of subscribed resources for University staff and students, Creative Commons licensed websites, and public domain content.

There are no copying or communication limits for broadcasts under the New Statutory Licence (this was also the case under the Part VA statutory licence). These copies may be included in library collections, added to PowerPoint presentations, sent to students via email, provided to staff for use in classes while they are employees of the University and made available via secure University services like Blackboard.

The copies may be made at the University or by University staff at home from any broadcast "received in Australia". This includes free-to-air, satellite and cable television broadcasts, as well as radio broadcasts*. The University Library may be able to obtain copies of past broadcasts from other libraries that hold copies made under the New Statutory Licence.

*The terms of the licence do not extend to commercially purchased or leased audio visual materials; or podcasts not originally broadcast in Australia (e.g. U.S. broadcast podcasts).

Subscribed and licensed material

The University Library subscribes to the following resources that contain broadcasts for you to use in your teaching, research or study.

YouTube and video-on-demand

The Statutory Licence does not cover material from video-on-demand and catch-up services such as Foxtel*, Stan, Netflix, or Presto. Material from these services cannot be played in class, or shared via Blackboard.

Material available from services such as Freeview and iView may be covered under the Statutory Licence providing the material is identical to that already broadcast on TV, and providing it is available for download. If it is only available in streaming mode, using software to capture the material will infringe copyright.
 

*SUGGESTION: Please have a look at EduTV (subscribed University Library eResource). It contains lots of legally accessible material that has been recorded from Foxtel channels.

 

The following information sheets have been produced by the Australian Copyright Council:

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Creative Commons material

With Creative Commons (CC) licences, creators can tell the world that they’re happy for their work to be copied, shared or even remixed. When a creator releases their work under a CC licence, you know what you can and can’t do with the work. As a result, you can freely copy, share and sometimes modify and remix CC material without having to worry about copyright, as long as you follow the licence.


There are a number of content repositories that allow you to search their website for CC licensed content. You can do this using many popular search engine and search tools.